Lent for the UU

02-14-18 - 04-01-18 All day

Lent begins on Ash Wednesday (in 2018: February 14th), marking the beginning of Lent, which is intended to be a time of self-denial, moderation, fasting, and the forsaking of sinful activities and habits.

Lent is the period of 40 days (which comes before Easter in the Christian calendar) set aside for reflection and preparation before the celebrations of Easter. By observing the 40 days of Lent, Christians replicate Jesus Christ’s sacrifice and withdrawal into the desert for 40 days. This year Lent starts on Feb 14th and Ends on Mar 29th.

We encourage each other to join in out UU Lent Practice of focusing on a word a day for spiritual growth and insight.

FEB 14 – FEB 18
WED – MINDFULLNESS, THU – DEVOTION, FRI – QUIET, SAT – HUMILITY, AND SUN – LOVE
 FEB 19 – FEB 25
MON – DIFFERENCE,  TUE – JOY,  WED – CURIOSITY,  THU – FEAR,  FRI – SUFFERING,  SAT – PRAYER, AND SUN – JUSTICE
 FEB 26 – MAR 4
MON – GRATITUDE,  TUE – CREATIVITY,  WED – FRIENDSHIP,  THU – DREAMS,  FRI – MISTAKES,  SAT – HEAL, AND SUN – HOSPITALITY
MAR 5 – MAR 11
MON – POSSIBILITY,  TUE – ABUNDANCE, WED – HEART,  THU – FAILURE, FRI – MEMORY,  SAT – AWE, AND SUN – STRUGGLE
 MAR 12 – MAR 18
MON – AWARENESS,  TUE – FREEDOM,  WED – PATIENCE,  THU – INSPIRATION,  FRI – HONESTY,  SAT – VULNERABILITY. AND SUN – HUNGER
 MAR 19 – MAR 25
MON – ACTION,  TUE – HOME,  WED – TEAMWORK,  THU – WORSHIP,  FRI – COMMUNITY,  SAT – DOUBT, AND SUN – MERCY
 MAR 26 – APR 1
MON – PASSION,  TUE – TRUST,  WED – HOPE,  THU – BELIEF,  FRI – CONNECTION,  SAT – FORGIVENESS, AND SUN – REJOICE
 

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  • 02-28-18 All day

    Purim is one of the most festive holidays in Judaism. Celebrated annually in either February or March, this joyous holiday commemorates the Jewish people's rescue from extermination in ancient Persia.

    Based on the conclusions of the Scroll of Esther (Esther 9:22):  "that they should make them days of feasting and gladness, and of sending portions one to another, and gifts to the poor"

    Purim is celebrated by:

    • Exchanging reciprocal gifts of food and drink known as mishloach manot
    • Donating charity to the poor known as mattanot la-evyonim
    • Eating a celebratory meal known as a se'udat Purim
    • Public recitation ("reading of the megillah") of the Scroll of Esther, known as kriat ha-megillah, usually in synagogue
    • Reciting additions, known as Al HaNissim, to the daily prayers and the grace after meals

    Jewish people all over the world celebrate this holiday, and even if you don't affiliate yourself with all the customs of Judaism, you can still join in on the unique observances of the holiday. Special activities, festivities, and meals are all part of observing Purim.

    Speaking of food, one of the best treats for Purim are hamantaschen: triangle-shaped cookie pastries with fruit or savory filling. The treat is said to look like Haman’s tri-cornered hat or his ears (“oznei Haman” in Hebrew). Sweet hamantaschen are most popular, with poppy seed, chocolate, date, apricot, or apple filling, but some bakeries are getting into savory fillings, like eggplant, mushroom, or different meats and cheeses.